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Tag Archives: kids

  • Cross Stitch Gifts For Kids

    Top Gifts To Cross Stitch Kids

    Cross stitch a special gift for each kid on your list with these unique patterns. Whether they like sports or fairies, drawing or reading, kids will love these fun cross stitch gifts! Get started on making these great gifts in time for the holidays.

    1. A Place To Hang Their Art: Stitch the kid on your list a customized sign. They will love proudly displaying their handiwork using the clips below this fun stitched design. A charming bear artist presents the grand masterpiece with colorful flair. Create this fun cross stitch for kids now with the Look What I Did! ePattern.

    Art Frame for Kids

    2. A Personalized Sporty Stitch: If the kid on your list is into sports, celebrate their recent achievements with a certificate or create a fun nameplate they can proudly hang on the wall. Create fun designs for kids playing any sport - soccer, volleyball, bowling, golf, baseball, bouncy ball, tennis, basketball, hockey, football! Get inspired to make the perfect gift with the fun alphabets and accents found in Sports Alphabets.

    Sports Signs For Kids

    3. A Fun Bookmark: These playful bookmarks make great gifts to cross stitch for kids! There is something for every kid whether they would enjoy cute rainbows and swirly hearts, flowers and butterflies, or spaceships and planets. Get started on these fun bookmarks and great gifts now with X Marks The Spot.
    Cross Stitch Bookmarks For Kids

    4. A Sock Monkey Room Sign: On a personalized pillow for hanging on a chair or doorknob, playful monkeys magically transform a child's room into a land full of laughter and glee -- reminding us of the innocent joys of our youth. A great gift for kids! Create this great gift now with the ePattern.

    Cross Stitch Room Sign For Kids

    5. A Flower Fairy Ensemble: Set a fun mood with the whimsical, vibrant floral stitches that kids will love. Create this matching tote bag, phone case, journal, and key ring set for a great gift. With a toy phone and fake keys, kids will love to play pretend using this set! Stitch this fun fairy set now with Bright Blooms.

    Cross Stitch Fairy Set For Girls

     

    Need more gift ideas? Check out our Gifts To Cross Stitch.

  • Chalk Coloring Added to Birdhouse with Mod Podge®

    I simply love my Leisure Arts' coloring books with their different themes! The latest one I used is also a new book from Leisure Arts; it is 6903 - Art of Coloring Nature. Having several wooden birdhouses at home, I wanted to incorporate using my coloring with a birdhouse. I got the perfect inspiration from another leaflet carried by Leisure Arts, 6569 - Family Activities using Mod Podge® products by Plaid. For anyone who used to decoupage, using Mod Podge® will be a breeze by comparison! Next, I explored using chalk pastels as my new coloring medium!

    For this birdhouse project, I used two books from Leisure Arts: 6903 - Art of Coloring Nature and 6569 - Family Activities showing the versatility of the Mod Podge® products by Plaid. For this birdhouse project, I used two books from Leisure Arts: 6903 - Art of Coloring Nature and 6569 - Family Activities showing the versatility of the Mod Podge® products by Plaid.

    I chose a page from 6903 - Art of Coloring Nature that had various designs with enough white space to easily add color using my chalk pastels. I was most excited about using a color for the vast amount of background space that seems to grow (ha, ha) as you near completion of your coloring in the main design area. I reviewed the Book Birdhouse project that is included in 6569 - Family Activities; I modified its steps and the products used to fit my current project.

    Chalk Pastels are a great medium to add a softer, yet intense amount of color to your coloring book designs. Chalk Pastels are a great medium to add a softer, yet intense amount of color to your coloring book designs.

    Chalk pastels give a softer, looser, or more impressionistic look to your coloring. Some artists would say it gives a more organic feel to a design. I love the way the colors remain intense and rich, with excellent coverage. I colored the background of my page first.

    Using Chalk Pastels, a neutral background color is added "loosely" without too much concern if it crossed over any black lines [see the upper left portion]. Then, use a cotton swab to spread the color evenly [see the bottom right portion of the page]. Using Chalk Pastels, a neutral background color is added "loosely" without too much concern if it crossed over any black lines [see the upper left portion]. Then, use a cotton swab to spread the color evenly [see the bottom right portion of the page].

    After blending the background brown color, I freely placed my colored chalk pastels in the remaining design spaces of the flowers, butterflies and ladybugs. I was not concerned if the chalk did not cover the entire white space because my next step would be to blend using a cotton swab.

    Loosely add some bright colors to the main pattern; flowers, butterflies and ladybugs are featured in this page from Leisure Arts' item 6903 - Art of Coloring Nature. Loosely add some bright colors to the main pattern; flowers, butterflies and ladybugs are featured in this page from Leisure Arts' item 6903 - Art of Coloring Nature.
    The after-effect of blending all of the bright colors. Be gentle as you loosely wipe over the Chalk Pastels with cotton swabs. The after-effect of blending all of the bright colors. Be gentle as you loosely wipe over the Chalk Pastels with cotton swabs.

    Now that my chalk coloring is done, I did not want the colors to smear. I sprayed my page with Mod Podge® Clear Acrylic Sealer; I chose the gloss finish. My next preparation was to spray paint my wooden birdhouse. I chose Krylon® Colormaster™  for indoor/outdoor use in a khaki color. As my spray painted birdhouse was drying, I considered what portion of it I would use to add my chalk pastel coloring book page.

    My advice is to read and then re-read the application process using the Mod Podge® product outlined. Easy steps and tips are outlined in the easy-to-follow instructions.

    Follow the Mod Podge® application directions specific to the product you are using. Leisure Arts' item 6569 - Family Activities outlines the Mod Podge® products with user-friendly tips and helpful hints. Follow the Mod Podge® application directions specific to the product you are using. Leisure Arts' item 6569 - Family Activities outlines the Mod Podge® products with user-friendly tips and helpful hints.

    To my amazement and delight, as the khaki spray paint was drying I realized that it was a very close match to the chalk pastel color I chose as my neutral background color. I could place my design almost anywhere on the birdhouse! I chose the left side of the roof and house, with cut out portions used as embellishments on the back side of the birdhouse.

    Following the Mod Podge® Classic Gloss application instructions, I added my coloring book page cut to fit the left portion of the rooftop and side panel of the birdhouse. After the colored designs were added, I applied Mod Podge® Gloss Sealer over all. Following the Mod Podge® Classic Gloss application instructions, I added my coloring book page cut to fit the left portion of the rooftop and side panel of the birdhouse. After the colored designs were added, I applied Mod Podge® Gloss Sealer over all.

    I couldn't resist adding some more cut designs onto the back panel of the birdhouse, too!

    I cut a free-form piece of my coloring book page and applied it using Mod Podge® Classic Gloss onto the back panel of the birdhouse. I like the visual effect of having some of the cut design area on the backside of the birdhouse; it assists to move your eye around the birdhouse project to view its different sides. I cut a free-form piece of my coloring book page and applied it using Mod Podge® Classic Gloss onto the back panel of the birdhouse. I like the visual effect of having some of the cut design area on the backside of the birdhouse; it assists to move your eye around the birdhouse project to view its different sides.

    I'm still playing with ideas regarding a final set-up inside my house where my birdhouse will live. My kitchen has great windows to view an open area with water and pine trees in the distance, or close-up viewing of a hummingbird feeder and patio flowers. Currently, I have a wooden bar stool near a window. Perhaps I could stack reference books on gardening and birds on it with the birdhouse on top of this stack?

    One idea: stack your themed items together: print books on birds, flowers, gardening, nature, and coloring! I'm still working on my setting: a wooden stool, a basket or a hanging shelf; the ideas keep coming to me! One idea: stack your themed items together: print books on birds, flowers, gardening, nature, and coloring! I'm still working on my setting: a wooden stool, a basket or a hanging shelf; the ideas keep coming to me!

    But, I might just make a more eclectic resting place for my birdhouse by suspending it from a ceiling, or near my Mac perched on a shelf with books on graphic art, impressionist painting and marimekko.

    Doesn't that extra bit of coloring onto the back panel of the birdhouse add so much more interest? It is a 3-D object so it really should have an interesting design element on more than one side. Doesn't that extra bit of coloring onto the back panel of the birdhouse add so much more interest? It is a 3-D object so it really should have an interesting design element on more than one side.

    Yes, I embrace both the digital and print worlds of life; it's part of my dimensional design. Whatever it is that you enjoy, incorporate some coloring into your world!

    Martha

  • Very Hungry Caterpillar Pencil

    Today's guest blogger is Cindy deRosier.  She has tweaked one of the projects from our Easy Foam Crafts book to create a custom creation kids will love.

    Screen Shot 2016-04-14 at 2.19.14 PM Easy Foam Crafts Book from Leisure Arts

    Hi! I'm Cindy deRosier from My Creative Life, here to share my version of a project from Easy Foam Crafts. When I saw the  Inch Worm Pencil, I was inspired to make a few tweaks to the directions to turn it into Eric Carle's beloved Very Hungry Caterpillar. Enjoy!

    Foam Pencil - Very Hungry Caterpillar

    The Very Hungry Caterpillar Pencil Materials: pencil, craft foam (green, yellow and purple), red pom pom, scissors, hole punch, glue gun

    Begin by cutting the green foam into a long, narrow strip, approximately 9" x 1". Round the corners, then use the hole punch to make a series of holes. (No need to measure anything - just eyeball it!) Cut the green foam scraps to make two oval inner eyes and a roughly gumdrop-shaped nose. Cut two oval outer eyes from the yellow foam, making them just larger than the green inner eyes. Next, cut two antenna from purple foam.

    Foam very hungry caterpillar pieces

    Thread the green body foam piece onto the pencil. Leave the writing end free.

    Green Foam Very Hungry Caterpillar Pencil

    Fold over the end of the body and glue it to the top of the pencil. (If you want the eraser to be accessible, skip this step. I used a color pencil without an eraser.) Glue the pom pom head in place. Finally, add the eyes, nose and antenna.

    Very Hungry Caterpillar Foam Craft Pencil

    -------

    Cindy has written hundreds of creative kids' crafts tutorials, which you can find at My Creative Life. She blogs about many other aspects of her creative life, including scrapbooking, recipes and cooking competitions, birthday challenges, themed parties and much more. If you make your own Very Hungry Caterpillar Pencil, please contact Cindy to let her know!

  • One-Skein Baby Projects

    Please welcome our Guest Blogger, Sharon Silverman.  Sharon is the author of Crochet Refresher, Tunisian Crochet Baby Blankets, Tunisian Shawls, and most recently One-Skein Baby Projects.  Her very popular Heirloom Frame Crochet Blanket ePattern gets rave reviews on LeisureArts.com.  She has two brand new ePatterns that you can be among the first to download.  They are a Mosaic Blanket ePattern and a Lacy Crescent Shawl.  Sharon is here today to tell us about her latest Leisure Arts Book: One-Skein Baby Projects.  

    “Good things come in small packages,” the saying goes, and that’s certainly true for babies and for crochet projects.  My goal for One-Skein Baby Projects was to create adorable designs that crocheters could whip up for a special little baby without a large investment of time or money. I’m delighted that Leisure Arts was on board with the concept and gave me the go-ahead.

    Photo 1, book cover One-Skein Baby Projects book cover.

    The first part of my design process was to decide what items to focus on, and to select yarn for each project. I was inspired by Bonbons and Vanna’s Palettes. Both are mini-skein sets from Lion Brand. So cute to have all of those colors in one package! Those seemed ideal for toys.

    Photo 2, Pretzel Rattle Pretzel Rattle

    I used Vanna’s Palettes for the Pretzel Rattle. Why a pretzel? I should probably confess that pretzels have fascinated me ever since I wrote a travel guidebook about my home state, Pennsylvania Snacks: Your Guide to Food Factory Tours. I learned that Lititz, Lancaster County is home to the first commercial pretzel bakery in America, and that the history of the pretzel extends as far back as 610 A.D. That’s the first documented instance of European monks rewarding children who had memorized their Bible verses and prayers with a pretiola, Latin for “little reward.”

    A pretzel-shaped rattle has other advantages, too: lots of places for baby to hold on, and holes that are perfect for peek-a-boo.

    Safety is always my top priority when designing baby items. For the rattle, I used an unopened tube of beads completely encased in clear, waterproof packing tape. It’s positioned in the middle of fiberfill stuffing so it’s completely hidden from view, from feel—and from little teeth. Unless an elephant steps on the rattle and then a tiger rips the packing tape and the bead tube to shreds, the beads pose no danger.  (If you are in regular contact with an elephant and a tiger, omit the bead rattle—although a choking hazard may be the least of your worries.)  

    Bouncy Block uses Lion Brand Bonbons for a bright-colored, highly textured cube that’s fun for little hands.

    Photo 3, Bouncy Block Bouncy Block

    I think crocheters will enjoy making this because each side is different. Instead of fiberfill stuffing, I used washable cotton batting because it is denser and keeps the block nice and plump while retaining its shape.

    Every baby needs a “lovey” to cuddle and snuggle with. The Snow Bear Lovey (Bernat Baby Sport and Patons Astra) is a sweet bear-and-blanket combination. I chose a textured stitch pattern on the blanket to keep it interesting for crocheters and for babies. The head, muzzle, nose, ears, and arms are made separately, then assembled and attached to the center of the blanket. The ears are definitely my favorite part of the Snow Bear’s head. Something about them makes me go, “Awww…”

    Photo 4, Snow Bear Lovey

    Once the toys were finished, I worked on baby garments from head to toe—literally!—the Bubble Hat (Red Heart Anne Geddes Baby), Ribbed Vest (Caron Simply Soft), and Booties for Cuties (Red Heart Baby TLC).

    My own children are in their twenties now and hence no longer suitable models for baby gear, so it was thrilling to see the smiling little boy wearing the Bubble Hat and the Ribbed Vest in Leisure Arts’ photos. Way to make my work look good, buddy!

    The hat is sized for 0-3 months, 6 months, and 12 months; the vest is sized for 0-3 months and 3-6 months.

    Baby Bubble Hat Bubble Hat
    Baby Ribbed Vest Ribbed Vest

    Booties for Cuties are designed to keep little tootsies warm. High cuffs cover the ankle and keep the footwear right where it belongs. This project is sized for 3-6 months and 6-9 months.

    Baby Crochet Booties for Cuties Pink Booties for Cuties - Pink
    Crochet Baby Booties for Cuties Blue Booties for Cuties - Blue

    One other garment, the Hibiscus Top in Lion Brand LB Cotton Bamboo, has very recently been published as a stand-alone ePattern by Leisure Arts on its website.

    Crochet Hibiscus Top Hibiscus Top

    Every parent will tell you that you can never have too many bibs or washcloths. The final three projects in the leaflet are two bibs and a set of washcloths.

    The Bright & Easy Bib (Patons Grace) is worked in single crochet so it’s nice and dense. The ties are worked as part of the neckline so there’s no chance they can come loose.

    Crochet Bright & Easy Bib for Baby Bright & Easy Bib

    The Pullover Bib (Bernat Handicrafter Cotton) has a stretchy neckline that makes it easy to get on and off. A variation on single crochet produces a tight weave to keep messes from getting through. This bib is sized for head circumference 14” and for 16”.

    Baby Pullover Bib to Crochet Pullover Bib

    Sunshine Washcloths (Lily Sugar ’n Cream) brighten up baby’s nursery or bath. Thick and thirsty cluster stitches make these quick cloths pretty and practical. Make a few, roll up and tie with ribbon, and pop them in a basket with baby toiletries for a charming shower gift.

    Baby Crochet Sunshine Washcloth Sunshine Washcloth

    It was a pleasure working with Leisure Arts on One-Skein Baby Projects. Along with doing the editing and photography, they added helpful video links to the patterns. What a great way for crocheters to learn something new or to get reacquainted with a technique they haven’t used in a while. In the past I’ve written Tunisian Crochet Baby Blankets, Tunisian Shawls, and Crochet Refresher for Leisure Arts; another leaflet, Easy Afghans, will be published this spring. They also offer some standalone ePatterns of my work on their site.

    My hope for One-Skein Baby Projects is that relatively new crocheters will find easy items to suit their skill level, experienced crocheters will enjoy exciting stitch patterns and techniques to hold their interest, and that the finished projects will put a smile on the faces of babies and their parents.

    One-Skein Baby Projects Table of Contents Table of Contents

    To tell you a little bit about me, I’m a lifelong crafter who switched gears from travel writing to crochet design after I rediscovered my love of crochet about ten years ago. I’m a professional member of the Crochet Guild of America and a design member of The National NeedleArts Association. I was a featured guest on HGTV’s fiber arts program, “Uncommon Threads,” and have been interviewed on numerous radio podcasts. Recently I expanded my crochet work to include large-scale museum installations, indoors and out. I love to travel and explore the outdoors, especially with my husband, Alan, and our two grown sons. So far I have visited 48 states, 5 Canadian provinces, and 9 European countries. You can find me on Facebook and Pinterest at Sharon Silverman Crochet; on Ravelry at CrochetSharon; and on my website, www.SharonSilverman.com. I would love to hear from you!

    Happy crocheting!

    Photo 14, Sharon Silverman Sharon Silverman
  • Pumpkin Hat

    100 Hats to Knit & Crochet

    I love Halloween. It is my favorite holiday. I have a friend with a new baby. So, I thought I would crochet him a cute little Pumpkin Hat. I used Crème de la Crème 100% cotton. I used three different colors orange, brown, and green. This pattern will fit an infant/toddler. I didn't get this pattern from a Leisure Arts book. 100 Hats to Knit and Crochet has hats that you could modify to work for your needs.

    Pumpkin Crochet Hat

    With a size G hook. Chain 60 stitches. Join in the round with a slip stitch. Be careful not to twist!

    Row 1: With main color (orange) chain 1, single crochets all the way around, and slip stitch into the chain 1. Row 2: Chain 3, double crochets all the way around. Continue Row 2 until the hat is about 3.25(3 ¼) to 3.50(3 ½) inches tall.

    Decrease is chain 3, 7 double crochet, and crochet 2 together, then 8 double stitches and crochet 2 together. You are going to continue decreasing by 1 stitch until you finish the chain 3 and 3 double crochet and crochet 2 together, 4 double crochet and crochet 2 together.

    Color change/Stem: To join the brown yarn slip stitch where you slipped the last stitch, chain 2, double crochet around. I didn’t crochet 2 together on the first round, because I did 2 regular double crochets into the next two stitches. The 3rd and 5th stitch a double into the middle of the lower stitch, and the 4th double crochet I went into the lower stitch. Continue this all the way around. The next round start your decreases chain 3, 2 double crochet and crochet 2 together, 3 double crochet and crochet 2 together. Continue decreasing by 1 stitch until you get to six stitches left and do double crochets until you get the stem length that you want then crochet 2 together 3 times.

    Green curly cue: Chain 35 stitches or however many you want to do. Do 6 double crochets into the 2nd stitch and 4 more stitches into ever chain stitch. Bind off when you get to the end. With a darning needle or crochet hook attach where ever you want it.

  • Busy Board

    I know that I have used this book Crafting with Buttons and Ribbons by Leisure Arts several times. But today I am using this book and a few others in a different way. Going on a summer trip or you need something quick and easy to make your toddler to kindergartner to keep them busy for a moment. I was flipping through this book when I came across the page with the Button Elephant and the templet for it when a light bulb went on and I thought to myself how cute would be to trace the animal and cut them out for a felt busy board for my very active 3 year old niece who is all hands when she comes over to my house. It is still 50/50 her playing with my dogs toys over her toys. She has discovered the dollhouse and has started showing interest in it. I am sure she will love this.

    IMG_8075

    For this project I used a piece of cardboard, scissors, Elmer’s craft glue, several pieces of felt, tracing paper, 1 fabric marker, 1 pencil,1 sheet of scrapbook paper, and a sticky sided piece of felt. After tracing and cutting out the templets. I then used a fabric marker to trace and cut out my animals. Why a fabric marker? The ink will disappear after it dries.

    FullSizeRender (8) FullSizeRender (13)

    After I finished with my animals I took out a piece of cardboard that I rescued from my recycling bin. I placed it under the sticky felt and used a pencil to trace to cut to fit the felt. Do not remove the sticker yet!! Then I grabbed the scrapbook paper and glue I glued one side of the cardboard and then I centered the cardboard piece on top of the scrapbook paper. Making sure the design side was facing down and not towards the glued cardboard, then I trimmed the top and bottom but leave the sides just flip it over and glue them to the back and the remove the stickered felt and line it up the best you can. I trimmed any sticky felt that was hanging over the edge. Once that is finished your busy board is done. To put away and store it I found a big plastic envelope at Office Depot for a dollar. The busy board fits in quite nicely and the back of the envelope was a perfect place to put the felt animals. I look forward to finding more things that I can use for the busy board.

    FullSizeRender (25)

  • Baby Washcloths Part One

    When I found this book by Leisure Arts called Baby Washcloths to Knit by Melissa Bergland Burnham I wanted to knit them all for my new baby cousin. So I set to work with knitting all 9 washcloths it take me about 6-8 hours to knit a washcloth but doing all 9 took more time because I get bored, busy with everyday tasks, and/or I work on other projects. But the one thing that I like about knitting washcloths they are small projects and you can take them everywhere.

    IMG_7863

    When I started I used 3 stitch markers or place markers and placed them after the first 5 stitches on the start of the wrong side, purl until you get to the last 5 and place the second marker. The third I used to mark the right side that is the side that is your pattern side. I like using these because sometimes I get so busy knitting away that I will knit straight across or purl, when I am supposed to be doing the opposite, and then I have to back out and try again. My favorite out of all 9 is the Sailboat and the Butterfly. I used Egyptian cotton on all 9 washcloths. Stay tune for tomorrows post to see what I plan on doing with all of these washcloths. I am super excited. I thought about doing this the moment that I saw this book.

    FullSizeRender (27) All 9 Baby Washcloths
  • Slouchy Beanie with a Twist

    I started this kids hat by Leisure Arts called Forward and Reverse from the book Knit Celebrity Slouchy Beanies for the Family three different times. The first time I either missed adding a stitch or I dropped a stitch. The second time I got two inches in and I didn’t really like how the pattern looked so I thought: “What if I didn’t leave off the purl stitch at the end of the second row knit the last nine? How would it look?” Hmmmmm!!

    IMG_7668

    So for the third time I cast on my 70 stitches and worked the rib stitch 1 ½ inches, worked my stitches off the size 6 circular needles to size 8 circular needles, and then the next round I added my stitches evenly around. Don’t forget to use place markers! I used 3 different place markers; the first, where I joined it in the round. The second,  to move up the hat so that when I do my decreases I know that is where I joined it and that is where I start decreasing. The third marker is the one that is going to continue to move around the hat.

    Since I adjusted the pattern slightly by a few stitches, I did a few extra rows to where I got to a purl 1 knit 1 at the place marker that shows where I connected it in the round and followed the rest of the pattern. If this knitting project wasn’t a success, well it would not have been my first or my last. One of the rules that I learned from my many art classes: you have to know the rules in order to break the rules. You have to at least try. You have to take a chance. All-in-all, this project was a success.

    FullSizeRender (24)

  • Button Barrettes

    Buttons! Buttons! Who’s got the buttons? I have the buttons. Remember when you were a kid and played this game on a rainy day at school. About a month ago I bought a jar of old buttons at an antique mall. One could say I have had button fever ever since. I have been looking at many projects that I could use my buttons on. I went to my current favorite book by Leisure Arts called Crafting with Buttons and Ribbons. I went and got some clip barrettes and sewed some different buttons to make Button Barrettes. I know that the book shows ribbon and a buttons. But I am not a fan of hair bows. After knotting the thread to secure that they do not come undone I dabbed a little super glue. It’s a very cute and unique style.

    Buttons! Buttons! Who's got the buttons? Buttons! Buttons! Who's got the buttons?
  • T-Shirt Bags

    T-shirt Bag T-shirt Bag

    It is Memorial Day Weekend that means warm weather can’t find a bag to take to the pool or beach. Back in April sometime around Earth Day I was aimlessly looking at different websites were I came across how to recycle old t-shirts. I cannot remember where I saw this. But I thought what a clever way to reuse those old favorite tees that you got a stain on or accidentally splashed bleach on or even your kid’s favorite tees that they have out grown. Turn them into bags. Make a bag for groceries, kid’s overnights, or even to give away as a gift. I myself never have enough bags to put projects in.

    Step One: Find a t-shirt that you don’t mind cutting up.

    FullSizeRender (16)

    Step Two: Cut sleeves and ribbing off the neck and arm. (I like cutting at the seam and I do the front first and lay it flat to cut a little more off the back so that the front and back matches)

    IMG_7554

    Step Three: Turn t-shirt inside out and lay flat making sure that the bottom seam is even then cute 3-4 inches on both sides after that is done you are ready to start cutting anywhere from ½ an inch to an inch. I didn't measure I just guessed at it.

    IMG_7555

    Step Four: Pick an end and start making knots all the way across.

    Remember you want to make sure to turn your shirt inside out so your knots don’t show. I hope that you enjoy recycling some old t-shirts. I don’t know if you can post photos of your projects. But if you can I would love to see some of them. I know that I didn't get this from a Leisure Arts book but here is another clever idea to recycle your favorite T-Shirts a book by Leisure Arts called T-Shirt Quilt by Linda Causee. Maybe some day when I have enough nerve I will do this with all of my Hard Rock Cafe tees that I have collected over the years.

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