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Leisure Arts Coloring

  • A Medley of Colors in a Mandala

    I've been doing some coloring lately, and looking through Art of Coloring Mandalas Adult Coloring Book has been a great way to enjoy the end of the day. I started coloring this page a little while ago:

    003I wasn't quite sure how I wanted to color this at first. I'm fine with things that look like plants or animals, but I wasn't sure what colors would look good on something like this Adult Coloring Book Page.

     

    So I went with all of them!

     

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    I started with the outer areas, and I'm not sure why.  I'm also not sure why I tend to color in a counter-clockwise circular pattern, either, but here we are.  I had time to notice these things about myself while I was working on this big floral-looking mandala.  That's about as meditative as I got.  I feel like I should be a little more meditative whenever I work in an adult coloring book, especially one with mandala patterns, but sometimes just focusing on coloring in the spaces and choosing the next color brings me plenty of tranquility.   I pulled my colored pencils out of the box in color groupings--the greens, the blues, and so on--and moved from dark tones to light ones as I colored my way to the center.

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    I've moved on to this sheet since finishing my rainbow mandala.

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    The colors are a little more haphazardly placed, and I thought some of the designs looked like bees so I colored them that way.  I'm using crayons on this page, and it's a more relaxed and silly approach.  Whichever method I use, I know I'm going to have a good time coloring these beautiful mandalas.

  • Heart Basket Using a Coloring Book Page

    Love is all around us - but more so this time of year with Valentine's Day fast approaching! You may share your love, appreciation, kindness and friendship with others by giving them a special handmade paper heart basket. An especially personalized feature would be to use one of your favorite coloring book pages to make a heart basket. Here's how to do it...

    You will make your heart basket from two folded pieces of paper. So your initial step is to choose two pieces of paper. My suggestion is to choose one page from a coloring book and the other from solid colored papers such as construction, writing or printer paper. Papers have different weights, so you may have to decide which works best for you. My coloring book page came from the Art of Coloring Patterns. I then used red construction paper purchased from a craft store chain as my solid color.

    6808 - Art of Coloring Patterns 6808 - Art of Coloring Patterns

    Make a decision whether or not you want your coloring book page to remain as a black and white patterned page, or colored with some portion of the page colored. I chose to put a little color randomly on the page.

    Add a pop of color here and there to the page, from 6808 - Art of Coloring Patterns. Add a pop of color here and there to the page, from 6808 - Art of Coloring Patterns.

    Next, I chose two solid colors: red and black are perfect complementary colors!

    Experiment with solid colors to be used with coloring book page from 6808 - Art of Coloring Patterns. Experiment with solid colors to be used with a coloring book page; this page from 6808 - Art of Coloring Patterns.

    After choosing your papers, fold each page in half lengthwise. Each half of the basket measures 2.25" wide, each with three strips for weaving. Each strip measures 0.75" wide x 2.5" high (not the entire height of the folded piece of paper).  Measure along the folded crease and make very light pencil marks to assist you when cutting.

    All pages have been measured and marked; let the cutting begin! (Hint: see how the coloring book page was temporarily turned inside out for measuring, etc.) All pages have been measured and marked; let the cutting begin! (Hint: Temporarily turn the coloring book page inside out for measuring, etc.)

    Now is a good time to erase any pencil markings. Turn your coloring book page right side out with the printed side visible.

    Cut all the halves and each strip for every basket; erase any pencil marks. Turn the coloring book page so the right side is facing out (from 6808 - Art of Coloring Patterns). Cut all the halves and each strip for every basket; erase any pencil marks. Turn the coloring book page so the right side is facing out (from 6808 - Art of Coloring Patterns).

    Select the two halves you have chosen, and turn the folded edges away from you. Work with each half at an angle as you begin weaving.

    Choose two halves, face the folded edges away from you and start weaving. Choose two halves, face the folded edges away from you and start weaving.

    I learned how to make Norwegian Baskets like this one as a young girl sitting next to my Grandmother. Since we can't sit next to each other, watching this YouTube video will be most helpful since the written instructions can get cumbersome.

    Each folded strip is woven this way: Looking at the example, start by weaving the inner most strips first; you will always work with two strips simultaneously. Because you are weaving, each strip of one color/side will pass through the inside, or around the outside of those strips of the opposite color.

    For instance, weave the first red strip and the first coloring book strip: the slightly 'opened' red strip is on the outside going around the outside of the first coloring book strip; then the first red strip goes through the inside middle coloring book strip; and finally, the first red strip goes around the outside of the third coloring book strip.

    As you are working, slide the woven strips towards the top of the cut strips making more room for the next strip to be woven.

    Start weaving the second red strip in an alternate pattern from the first red strip. For instance, weave the second red strip through the inside of the first coloring book strip; then, around the middle coloring book strip; and, finally, through the third coloring book strip.

    The weaving alternates with each strip; you will see the pattern develop as you progress. The weaving alternates with each strip; you will see the pattern develop as you progress.

    After all of the strips are woven, you will be able to open your basket. If you can't, then an error has been made in the weaving. Try undoing carefully and start over. Now get a sharp pair of scissors.

    When your weaving in complete, turn the heart basket around with the point facing towards you. When your weaving is complete, turn the heart basket around with the point facing towards you.

    Round the square edges by gently holding the two halves together while cutting; this will create the heart shape. From your saved 'extra' pieces of paper, cut a folded strip to use as the basket's handle. Remember, a handle is optional.

    To give a heart-shaped appearance to the basket, round the tops by cutting away square edges. An optional handle is cut from the extra solid paper; secure it with tape or glue. To give a heart-shaped appearance to the basket, round the tops by cutting away the square edges. An optional handle is cut from the extra solid paper; secure it with tape or glue.

    Secure your basket's handle with tape or glue. As a young girl during Christmas, I would make these Norwegian Baskets annually from the opened presents'  wrapping paper. As I got older, these baskets were fun to make for college friends, then I taught Girl Scout troops how to make them and my women's group to make as part of a service project. Now I am sharing both my heritage and love for coloring with you. Relax, enjoy, color and create!

    Happy Valentine's Day --

    Martha

     

     

  • Mandala

    Stuck at home today due to snow storm. I think it will melt by tomorrow so I will not go stir crazy. To help the day move along faster I covered up under my favorite fleece blanket, pulled out my stack of Leisure Arts coloring books, and colors. I chose the new Mandala coloring books that Leisure Arts just released. I used my florescent color pencils, metallic color pencils, and glittery gel pens that I found at Barnes and Noble.

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    The Mandala is very therapeutic. According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary (and this is abbreviated), the Mandala is a Hindu or Buddhist graphic symbol and it is often a symbolic pattern usually in the form of a circle. When coloring a Mandala, I like to pick 7 colors and repeat them in order. I find that when I color it relaxes me.

    The hardest part in coloring is picking colors and deciding what materials I want to use to color: color pencils, color pens, crayons, and color gel-pens. I will tell you this, I used a violet shade color pencil to color a part of this Mandala and I had difficulty keeping it sharpened. My lead kept breaking because I had dropped the pencil and it broke the lead into several pieces inside. So try not to drop your colored pencils. One more thing, when coloring a Mandala work inside out so nothing smears. So go bring out your inner child and color. Ask your friends over for a coloring party. Put on your favorite music and get your coloring on. Have fun playing with your box of crayons!

  • There's Always Something More to Color!

    Sometimes when I'm coloring, I get into a rush to hurry up so I can see the finished page.

    But other times, I catch myself wishing the project would last a little longer.

    Flower coloring page

    This was a lovely colored page!  I will miss it!

    flower color page

    But wait!  What are those little circles in the background?

    Orange color flower - Adult Coloring BookI don't know what they are, but I know I'm going to color them and I'm glad this page has a few more details for me to enjoy.

    When you're having such a good time, it's nice when there's always another detail to enjoy.  I'm going to have a lovely time taking a little more time to add a little more color.

  • Coloring Decor for Christmas

    Many of us here at Leisure Arts have been coloring because we truly enjoy it. In preparation for our annual Christmas Celebration Luncheon, we talked about tabletop decorations. As part of our discussions, I'm sharing with you a great idea that combines coloring with the spirit of the holiday season!

    Christmas trees are part of many traditional household Christmas decorations. Many stand-alone trees in yards and inside homes are shining brightly with illuminated lights and ornaments. Smaller ferns, trees and other greenery are incorporated in the seasonal decor that adorn tabletops during family meals and other social gatherings.

    Sprucing up the tables for Leisure Arts' Christmas Celebration Luncheon was discussed as part of the preparation -- and using some coloring book pages to help with the decor seemed like a natural thing to do, too. 

    To start, choose a page from the stash of coloring books, and color it. You would be surprised at how many pages come to life after they are colored. Look at the difference coloring made in the before and after pictures below. I like the design "before", but wait until "after" it's colored... 

    Kaleidoscope Wonders     Kaleidoscope Wonders  (Click photos to enlarge.)

    The page has come to life! This page comes from Kaleidoscope Wonders; it was colored by my co-worker, Marsha. It looked like Christmas ornaments to my other co-worker, Tina, so she decided to try out a decorating idea that she had.

    A tabletop Christmas tree could be created by using layers or rows of strips of paper; it was an idea similar to the Ribbon Tree project found in the leaflet Crafting with Buttons and Ribbons. Tina experimented with a selection of materials. Once Tina decided on her material choices, she then got everything prepared.

    Kaleidoscope Wonders Coloring Crafts  (Click photo to enlarge.)

    The supplies included a floral foam tree shape (7" tall), strips of paper (a page from Kaleidoscope Wonders) plus solid and patterned paper (all strips were 0.5" w x 6" long [or shorter, as needed for design]), straight pins, Snow Writer by DecoArt (for the decorative snow at the top of the tree), and a star ornament (with its hanging bell removed).

    After all of her strips of paper were cut, Tina started by securing each row of paper to the foam tree with straight pins; Tina started with the bottom layer first and worked her way up to the top of the tree.

      (Click photo to enlarge.)Kaleidoscope Coloring Christmas Tree

    The beauty about using straight pins to hold your strips of paper into a foam shape is that you can reposition the strips if necessary. Or, you can swap out an entire row changing from one color to another all together!

    Tina worked quickly once she decided on the placement of her colors. Near the top of the tree, she cut her strips of paper in half to 3" long -- use your judgment to decide what length is right for your size tree. Then, the star ornament that had its bell removed, was jabbed into the top of the foam shape. Once the star was in place, Tina added Snow Writer by DecoArt (the dimensional snow) and let it dry for at least 24 hours -- please read the label for full instructions.

    I've never seen a tabletop tree quite like this one; it's beautiful! Coloring can be incorporated into your home as part of a 3D project. Now my coloring book pages take on a whole new future -- glass plates, book covers, furniture... What will you do?

    Kaleidoscope Wonders Christmas Tree  (Click photo to enlarge.)

    Special thanks go out to Tina and Marsha for this piece of holiday decor. Merry Christmas!

    Martha

  • Make Coloring Book Pages into More

    As I have said over the years, I love to color! It is a natural outlet of creativity for me. A new box of crayons, pencils or markers always made me smile.  Coloring was never a phase for me; it was something that made me, me!

    Paper pumpkin from coloring book pages. Paper pumpkin from coloring book pages.

    The mass appeal of coloring has reignited! You know you can color by yourself as a means of entertainment or meditation. But don't forget coloring can be done in a group as a play date or coloring party. Whatever your preference, just relax, be imaginative and have fun!

    Holiday crunch time is here with Thanksgiving right around the corner! Families and friends will gather. They may need an outlet for their pent-up energy and excitement, especially if the weather is uncooperative for outdoor play. Coloring fits the bill. It is an activity that is not too demanding, does not require an organizer, and is not food-related.  Added bonus -- it can be done in a group setting! What a great way to offer your group gathering a stress-free, decorative and interactive activity!

    I saw similar projects to my finished paper pumpkin posted on Pinterest. I kept playfulness in mind, as I experimented with pages from my adult coloring books to make decorative paper pumpkins. After I had fun coloring, I found what worked best for me and now I'll share my steps with you.

    I used two pages from Jungle Wonders Color Art for Everyone; one page had areas colored with markers, the second page was uncolored. I'll show you how I made my paper pumpkins.

    Colored page using markers. Colored page using markers.

    I knew that I would be cutting my two pages into strips so even the colored page did not have every part of its design filled with marker. I used colors that were more fall-like to match my other seasonal decor.

    Uncolored page. Uncolored page.

    Getting my pages ready...

    Pages cut into strips - see other image for dimensions. Pages cut into strips - see other image for dimensions.

    Each coloring book page would yield five 2-inch strips, measuring the page when it was turned horizontally (landscape mode). I used two pages to make one paper pumpkin.

    Two-inch wide strips. Each with two centered punched holes, one at top and bottom respectively, one-half inch from edge. Two-inch wide strips. Each with two centered punched holes, one at top and bottom respectively, one-half inch from edge.

    With the cutting done, I marked where my punched holes would be on either end of each strip. Next, I stacked my strips and got a 12-inch long pipe cleaner ready.

    Two stacks of coloring book pages; uncolored on left, colored on right. Plus, a 12 inch long pipe cleaner. Two stacks of coloring book pages; uncolored on left, colored on right. Plus, a 12 inch long pipe cleaner.

    Making a spiral at one end of the pipe cleaner helps to secure it as the base of the pumpkin. All strips will then be placed on the pipe cleaner.

    Make a spiral base at one end of the pipe cleaner. Make a spiral base at one end of the pipe cleaner.

    Decide how you would like to order your strips. In a random order or in a sequence to create a particular design pattern. I alternated between uncolored and colored strips.

    Slide each strip onto pipe cleaner - right side down. Alternate uncolored page with colored page, starting with the bottom hole. Slide each strip onto pipe cleaner - right side down. Alternate uncolored page with colored page, starting with the bottom hole.

    After all the strips are stacked by their bottom holes onto the pipe cleaner, feed the pipe cleaner through their top holes.

    Now weave the pipe cleaner through the top hole of each strip. Now weave the pipe cleaner through the top hole of each strip.

    You might have to bend your pipe cleaner above the spiral base in order for it to stand up straight. Repeat as necessary while you are fanning out each pumpkin strip, as described in the next step.

    From the side, slide your strips down until a nice arch forms. This angle will become your rounded pumpkin shape. From the side, slide your strips down until a nice arch forms. This angle will become your rounded pumpkin shape.

    Rework the pipe cleaner as necessary so it stands up on a tabletop as you are fanning out the strips making your pumpkin shape.

    Fan out each strip from the stack starting with the innermost strip. Fan out each strip from the stack starting with the innermost strip.

    After all the strips are fanned out, and you are satisfied with the pumpkin's look, curl the top of your pipe cleaner so it looks like a stem. Wrap your pipe cleaner around a pencil to get a great curlicue shape!

    After all the strips are fanned out, curl your pipe cleaner into a stem. After all the strips are fanned out, curl your pipe cleaner into a stem.

    Yeah, all done; transformation complete. Just think how much fun making paper pumpkins would be during your Thanksgiving celebration! Young and old(er) friends and family could be coloring pages and constructing paper pumpkins at the same time.

    Finished paper pumpkin! Adult coloring books can be used to make seasonal decor! Finished paper pumpkin! Adult coloring books can be used to make seasonal decor!

    Everyone's participation creates seasonal remembrances, tabletop decor, or make-and-take gifts to be carried home. Relax during the holidays, have fun and color!

    What other fun art projects will you do with your coloring book pages?

  • Using Coloring Pages for Another Craft

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    What do you do when you finish a page in a coloring book for adults?  I was going to be flippant and say "You're an adult. You do whatever you want with it.", but now I'm curious about what you do with your own coloring books at home.  Do you stick pages on the fridge you own because you're an adult?  Use a page as a bookmark in a coffee table book on your grown-up coffee table? I decided to turn one of my coloring pages into a craft.  Here's a page I colored a while back.  It's a nice leafy-looking page from Natural Wonders.

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    And here's my gratitude tree.

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    I n case Pinterest hasn't told you, a gratitude tree is a fun Thanksgiving craft where you write down what you're thankful for on scraps of paper and then affix them to a branch.  I found this branch on the sidewalk while on a walk last week and brought it home just for this.  It's a little bit too large for our table, but my little girl thinks the seed pods look like bats and she loves it just as it is.  I cut out some vaguely leaf-shaped pieces of paper with some scrapbooking paper and she's been practicing her handwriting while we think of all the things we're thankful for.  Last year, we did 3 or 4 leaves a day and it was a lot of fun.  I also really like emphasizing all the people we love and all the good things we have before the season of Christmas advertising and the subsequent begging for every toy in sight begins.  Look closely! There's a leaf on the right that says "Mom"!  She's thankful for me and I have it in writing now!

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    So back to my coloring page.  It has leaves.  I have a tree. So  I cut out a few pieces of leaves.

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    And wrote down a few things I am thankful for.

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    And as for the rest of the paper?  I cut out some vaguely leaf-shaped pieces.

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    It's good to have a stash of leaves.  I've even gotten ahead of the game this year and added some yarn loops by threading a tapestry needle, pulling it through the paper, and tying the ends together in a knot.  You can use Christmas ornament hooks or a hot glue gun and it will work just as well.  Because we're all adults here, and (at least when it comes to crafting) we can do whatever we want.

    But for real, let me know what you do with your finished coloring sheets if you feel like sharing!

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